The Case for Natural Refrigerants Including Some Examples for CO2 in Commercial Buildings, Hospitals and Supermarkets in Melbourne

published Mar 26, 2015 - 16 pages

This presentation was made in a panel organised by the trade magazine Climate Control News (CCN).

Summary

The supermarket industry in Australia consumes three times as much energy per unit floor area as hospitals. And nearly eight times as much as office buildings. The possibilities of reducing the energy consumption in all building categories are great and very significant as shown on slides 8-10. Slide 12 shows a schematic of a Tot

This presentation was made in a panel organised by the trade magazine Climate Control News (CCN).

Summary

The supermarket industry in Australia consumes three times as much energy per unit floor area as hospitals. And nearly eight times as much as office buildings. The possibilities of reducing the energy consumption in all building categories are great and very significant as shown on slides 8-10. Slide 12 shows a schematic of a Total Energy CO2 system doing all the cooling and virtually the heating – except for some steam for high temperature cooking. This system will be publicly tendered by the NSW government Public Works department. Slide 13 shows the potential impact of the G20 decision to phase down HFC consumption by 79% below mid 2013 levels by the year 2030. The combined effect of the 79% phase down plus expected growth represents a volume of business equal to about 150% of the presently installed HFC capacity world wide by 2,050. This is the battle ground between the proponents of Natural and Chemical Refrigerants. Exciting times ahead when one considers that the world market for refrigerants is estimated at US $15.4 billion this year, less than 1% of which is for the Natural Refrigerants Ammonia, CO2, Hydrocarbons, Air and Water.


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